Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP)

Every student attending a secondary school in the York Catholic District School Board has the opportunity to be involved in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP). Students are able to explore exciting careers in apprenticeship occupations through the Cooperative Education program.

Students, parents/guardians and employers are encouraged to explore the benefits of OYAP, to read testimonials and to discover how OYAP provides choices and pathways towards successful careers.

The Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) is a School to Career program that opens the door for students to explore and work in apprenticeship occupations starting in grade 11 or grade 12 through the Cooperative Education program. Students have an opportunity to become registered apprentices and work towards becoming a certified journeyperson in a skilled trade while completing their secondary school diploma.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP)?
The Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) is a School to Career program that opens the door for students to explore and work in apprenticeship occupations starting in grade 11 or grade 12 through the Cooperative Education program. Students have an opportunity to become registered apprentices and work towards becoming a certified journeyperson in a skilled trade while completing their secondary school diploma.
What are the student enrollment guidelines?

Students who wish to enroll in OYAP must:

  • be 16 years of age
  • be a full time student in a secondary school
  • have 16 high school credits
  • be working towards their Ontario Secondary School Diploma.
What is an apprenticeship?
An apprenticeship is a hands on training program for people who enjoy learning by doing and earning while learning. The training provides access to well-paying jobs that demand a high level of skills, judgment and creativity. Employers provide about 90 percent of apprenticeship training in the workplace. The remaining 10 percent involves classroom instruction on theory which is usually delivered at an approved community college or training organization. Upon successful completion of the practical and in-school components, apprentices have an opportunity to write the provincial/interprovincial exam to become a certified journeyperson in a skilled trade.
Does an OYAP student earn a wage?
Payment of a wage to an OYAP student during the hours of their Cooperative Education placement is at the discretion of their employer. Students who are registered apprentices must be paid a wage while working beyond school hours or after graduation as apprentices.
What kinds of jobs are available in the skilled trades?

There are over 130 skilled trades in Ontario covering the automotive, industrial, construction and service sectors. Some examples:

Automotive

  • Auto Service Technician
  • Auto Body/Collision Repairer
  • Partsperson
  • Small Engine Technician
  • Motorcycle Mechanic

Construction

  • General Carpenter
  • Electrician
  • Plumber
  • Refrigeration/AC Mechanic
  • Sheet Metal Worker

Industrial

  • Facilities Maintenance Technician
  • General Machinist
  • Tool & Die Maker
  • Mould Maker
  • Cabinetmaker
  • Welder

Service

  • Early Childhood Educator
  • Education Assistant
  • Child & Youth Worker
  • Horticultural Technician
  • Information Technology Support Analyst
How do I get an apprenticeship after graduating from high school?

You have three choices:

  • If you are an OYAP student, you simply continue your apprenticeship training with your employer. You will be required to attend several short periods of in-school training at a college or training organization.
  • Enroll in a college apprenticeship program where you will take all of the in-school theory before starting the 'on-the-job' training portion.
  • Find an employer who is willing to sponsor/mentor you in a full time 'on-the-job' apprenticeship. You will be required to attend several short periods of in-school training at a college or training organization.

For all the above choices, you must write a provincial exam to become a licensed journeyperson upon successful completion of training and schooling.

What kind of wages can i expect as a skilled tradesperson?
While wages vary from trade to trade, with training and experience you can expect to earn above minimum wage in most positions. Many qualified journeypersons (who have obtained their Certificate of Apprenticeship) earn between $40,000 and $60,000.
Will I have career mobility as an apprentice?
Yes ... many skilled workers move into positions in management, teaching, writing, or start their own business.
Can I get started on my apprenticeship training before I complete high school?
Yes. You can do so by applying for the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) at your school, you can become a youth apprentice and begin your post-secondary training schedule while earning your secondary school credits.
Where can I get more information?
Talk to a teacher in Cooperative Education, Guidance, or Technological Studies program in your school. To apply, you need to complete an application form for a Cooperative Education placement.

Benefits of the OYAP

Benefits for Students

  • an opportunity to get a 'head start' in an apprenticeship by reducing time and expenses that would be spent in training after high school
  • a seamless transition from school to post secondary training
  • an opportunity to develop a valuable network of employers for future job opportunities
  • valuable work experience, employability skills and an understanding of employer expectations
  • an opportunity to explore interesting and creative apprenticeship occupations for career decision making
  • an opportunity to become registered apprentices while working towards their secondary school diploma
  • provides an 'open door' to well paid employment

Benefits for Employers

  • provides a work force of young people who have skills and work experience
  • helps identify and train future skilled trades people
  • enables employers to participate directly in the education and training of students
  • enables employers to train potential employees to their company standards
  • gives the employer the opportunity to observe and assess the capabilities of a potential apprentice before making a long term commitment
  • assists in increasing the positive perception of the trades
  • employers benefit from the student's increasing performance and productivity
  • qualifies for a wage subsidy program

Student Enrollment Procedure

  1. Select Cooperative Education/OYAP and a related in-school subject and/or related academic course on your Option Sheet at your school. (Consult your Guidance and Co-op teacher). Click here for Apprenticeship Subject Pathways 
  2. Choose a career in an Apprenticeship Occupation.
  3. Some apprenticeship occupations are also available through Off-Campus Programs.
  4. Complete an Application Form and have an interview with your Cooperative Education teacher.
  5. Successfully complete your Co-op/OYAP placement with an employer. (Remember, this is a trial period for you and the employer).
  6. If you and your employer agree, register as an apprentice with the Apprenticeship Consultant's approval. Your Co-op teacher will coordinate the registration.
  7. Complete all required courses for your high school diploma.
  8. Some Off-Campus programs require students to attend the Level One in-school apprenticeship course followed by Co-op/OYAP placement.

Post Secondary

  1. Attend a Level One in-school apprenticeship course as instructed by the MTCU (Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) Consultant and continue your apprenticeship training with your employer.
  2. Upon successful completion of training and schooling, write the provincial exam to become a licensed journeyperson.
  3. Continue your career as a life long learning experience.

Apprenticeship Occupations

Automotive

  • alignment & brakes technician
  • auto body & collision damage repairer
  • auto body repairer (branch 2)
  • automotive electronic accessory technician
  • automotive glass technician
  • automotive painter
  • automotive service technician
  • farm equipment technician
  • fuel & electrical systems technician
  • heavy duty equipment technician
  • marine engine mechanic
  • motorcycle mechanic
  • powered lift truck technician
  • recreation vehicle mechanic
  • small engine technician
  • tire, wheel & rim mechanic
  • transmission technician
  • truck & coach technician
  • truck-trailer service technician
  • turf equipment technician

Construction

  • brick and stone mason
  • cement finisher
  • cement mason
  • construction boilermaker
  • construction craft worker
  • construction millwright
  • drywall applicator
  • drywall finisher & plasterer
  • electrician (construction & maintenance)
  • electrician (domestic & rural)
  • floor covering installer
  • general carpenter
  • glazier & metal mechanic
  • heat & frost insulator
  • heavy equipment operator dozer
  • heavy equipment operator excavator
  • heavy equipment operator tractor loader backhoe
  • hoisting engineer mobile crane operator, branch 1
  • hoisting engineer mobile crane operator, branch 2
  • hoisting engineer tower crane operator, branch 3
  • ironworker
  • lineworker: construction
  • lineworker: power
  • native residential construction worker
  • painter and decorator (commercial & residential)
  • painter and decorator (industrial)
  • plumber
  • precast concrete erector
  • precast concrete finisher
  • refrigeration & air conditioning mechanic
  • reinforcing rodworker
  • restoration mason
  • roofer
  • sheet metal worker
  • sprinkler & fire protection installer
  • steamfitter
  • terrazzo, tile & marble setter

Industrial

  • aircraft maintenance engineer
  • bearings mechanic
  • blacksmith
  • cabinetmaker
  • carperson (railway)
  • cnc programmer
  • composite structures technician (aircraft)
  • die design
  • draftsperson mechanical
  • draftsperson plastic mould design
  • draftsperson tool & die design
  • electric motor rewind mechanic
  • electrical control (machine) builder
  • elevating device mechanic
  • facilities mechanic
  • facilities technician
  • fitter-assembler (motor assembly)
  • fitter (structural steel / plateworker)
  • fitter welder
  • general machinist
  • hydraulic/pneumatic mechanic
  • industrial electrician
  • industrial instrument mechanic
  • industrial mechanic millwright
  • locksmith
  • machine tool builder & integrator
  • mould design
  • mould or die finisher
  • mould maker
  • optics technician (precision lens & prism maker)
  • packaging machine mechanic
  • pattern maker
  • precision metal fabricator
  • process operator (refinery, chemical & liquid processes)
  • pump systems installer
  • roll grinder/turner
  • saw filer/fitter
  • ski lift mechanic
  • surface blaster
  • surface mount assembler
  • tool & cutter grinder
  • tool and die maker
  • tool and gauge inspector
  • tool/tooling maker
  • water meter installer
  • water well driller
  • welder

Services

  • aboriginal early childhood educator
  • agriculture dairy herdsperson
  • agriculture fruit grower
  • agriculture swine herdsperson
  • appliance service technician
  • arborist
  • baker
  • baker/patissier
  • chef
  • child & youth worker
  • cook assistant branch 1
  • cook branch 2
  • early childhood educator
  • early childhood educator (inclusion practices)
  • educational assistant
  • electronic service technician
  • gemsetter/goldsmith
  • hairstylist
  • horse groom
  • horse harness maker
  • horticultural technician
  • information technology
  • support analyst hardware
  • information technology support analyst help desk
  • information technology support analyst network
  • microelectronics manufacturer
  • native clothing & crafts artisan
  • network cabling specialist
  • partsperson (automotive)
  • pool & hot tub/spa installer
  • pool & hot tub/spa service technician
  • retail meat cutter
  • saddlery
  • special events coordinator
  • wooden boat rebuilder/repairer

Off-Campus and Focus Programs

Career Opportunities Focus OYAP Location Duration
General Carpenter no yes Local 27Carpenter's Training Centre Semester II Full Day
Drywall Installer & Finisher no yes Interior Finishers Training Centre Semester II Full Day
Cook/Chef no yes Humber College Semester II Full Day
Horticultural Technician no yes Humber College Semester II Full Day
Computer Numerical Control Programming (CNC) yes yes Seneca College Contact: Mr. Rodney Burley, St. Elizabeth CHS Semester II - PM Optional Summer OYAP/Coop
Aviation Technology yes yes St. Robert CHS Contact: Ms. Toni Pinelli Semesters I & II Optional Summer OYAP/Coop
Brick & Stone Mason
Cement Finishers
Construction Crafts
yes yes Local 183 Universal Workers Union Semester I or II
Plumbing no yes The City College George Brown College: 160 Kendall Avenue, Toronto Contact: Rolf Priesnitz phone: 416-415-5000 Semester II Full Day

Resources

OYAP Students in the News

Thomas Vitti

Carpenter Journeyperson Apprentice

Panigas Interior Construction and Store Fixturing Ltd.

Alexandra Macri

Pastry Chef Apprentice

Park Hyatt Hotel

Kyle Nesbitt

CNC Machinist

Student at Cardinal Carter CHS with Grade 8 student, Peter DeCastro

Joe Iannuzzi

Carpenter Apprentice

Panigas Interior Construction and Store Fixturing Ltd.

Phillip Bent

Interior Finishing Apprentice

Trans-Ontario Ceilings and Wall Systems

James Veltkamp

Horticultural Technician Apprentice

Nice Landscape Design

L. Baldassarre

Chef Apprentice

Splendido Restaurant

Joseph Lanzolla

Automotive Service Technician Apprentice

J & L Auto Service

Freddie Pincente

Plumber Apprentice

A & E Plumbing

Domenic Fazzarri

Chef Apprentice

Spezzo Restaurant

Michael Modica

Automotive Service Technician Apprentice

Roy Foss Motors Ltd

Jeremy Mathieson

Plumber Apprentice

A & E Plumbing

Adam Griffin

Drywall Finisher Apprentice

Tabrco Drywall Systems

Steve Mamo

Carpenter Apprentice

La Sicula Construction Management

Jason Ewing

CNC Machinist Apprentice

Palcam Technologies Ltd

Brad Shaw

Aviation Technology Apprentice

Canadian Flyers International

S. De Angelis

Retail Meat Cutter Apprentice

Stuart Carroll Quality Meats

Americo Magana

Commercial and Industrial Electrician Apprentice

Duplex Electrical

Stephanie Terzo

Hairstylist Apprentice

You Salon and Spa

Melissa Romano

Early Childhood Educator Apprentice

Grace Church Daycare

Rohan Rojas

Chef Apprentice

Toronto Board of Trade Country Club

Vince Mannella

Automotive Service Technician Apprentice

Woodbine Chrysler

Nick Di Adamo

Computer Numerical Control (CNC) student

J. P. Cipollone

Electrician Apprentice

Con-Cor Electrical Contracting

Rory Thompson

Chef Apprentice

Howard Johnson Hotel